How This D2C Shoe Company Is Changing the Fashion Industry | Fast Company


(quiet rock music) – I think we’ve seen a big secular shift in the way that people think
about the work that they do. Coming out of the 50s and
60s, the baby boomers, we realized that we’re able
to do more with our time, giving back to the planet,
giving back to one another. We’re looking for more
purpose with what we do. – [Narrator] Out of an
estimated 75,000,000 workers in the fashion industry around the world, only 2% earn a living wage. Nisolo, a Nashville-based fashion brand that produces its goods in Peru, has made a commitment that all employees earn a living wage, including
benefits such as healthcare. – Nisolo is a direct-to-consumer, digitally-native fashion brand
with an ethical component, in terms of how we manufacture our goods. The company’s founder, Patrick Woodyard, is originally from the South, spent some time in Nashville growing up, and went to Olemiss. After graduating, went and joined a micro-finance organization
in Trujillo, Peru, in order to really just get
to live at the intersection of business and ethics. And upon further research, he realized that Trujillo used to be the shoe making capital of Peru and there were thousands
of people in that industry who no longer had access to market with the injection of China and importing a lot of shoe making goods. And so he put a business plan together, bagged his MBA books that he was planning on
getting a master’s in business, and realized that there was an
opportunity and went for it. (cheerful music) We looked at several different cities in which to start Nisolo and
get Nisolo off the ground but really the opportunity in
Nashville is so significant. The fact that we can
reach 75% of the country within one day of shipping
is just a really ripe place for direct-to-consumer eCommerce brands. There are a lot of
socially-conscious companies that are housed in Nashville and I think that comes
from a strong history of charitable contributions
that exist in the South and a lot of non-profits. So there is just that
strong legacy history of non-profit-type work
that exists in Nashville and making that transition
from a non-profit to a for-profit social enterprise
is a relatively easy job. (calm music) I think we’ve seen a big secular shift in the way that people think
about the work that they do. Coming out of the 50s and
60s, the baby boomers, that was a post-war era where really it was just about
having a more consistent, stable, easy, accessible life with a lot of consumer
goods and things like that. And as we’ve grown and evolved past that, I think that people have realized that they can use their time
in order to do good things and give back to the world and that we are not yet
willing to give up (chuckling) some of the ease of accessibility and kind of an on-demand attitude. But I think a lot of people
that are like me, again, recognize some of the
privilege that we’ve gotten somewhat arbitrarily, just because of the
place that we were born, the education we had access
to, the color of our skin, and we want to see past that and use that privilege as a
way to really improve the world and advocate for people who maybe weren’t necessarily so
lucky to be born with that. This is an incredibly different place from many places that
I’ve worked in the past. The fact that we have such
a strong mission and purpose that drives the work that we’re doing really shows up in the work
that we’re doing every day and motivates people
to go above and beyond because they recognize that
we’re not just selling shoes, we’re creating jobs, we’re
changing livelihoods, and that work is incredibly meaningful.

2 thoughts on “How This D2C Shoe Company Is Changing the Fashion Industry | Fast Company

  1. A big covert secualrist religion shift , hard core secualrist asstheist zealots with strings to there satanist secularist overlords, the women sounds like the slimy cia ambassadir yovanovitch

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *